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Daniel focuses his practice on issues relating to employment law and unfair competition. He represents clients nationwide in the realm of trade secret theft, non-competition and non-solicitation agreements, and breaches of fiduciary duties.  In addition, he helps companies conduct complex internal investigations regarding intellectual property theft, computer fraud and data privacy issues.

Enacted in 2008, the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) continues to be the most consumer-friendly biometric privacy law in the country. In the wake of the Illinois Supreme Court’s seminal 2019 decision in Rosenbach v. Six Flags, plaintiffs have filed hundreds of class action lawsuits against businesses and employers in a broad range of

In an interview with TechTarget, Chicago Taft partners Marcus Harris and Daniel Saeedi explored the impacts that the pandemic will have on ERP implementations and what customers can do to alleviate risk and protect their ERP investments. In a separate interview, Marcus Harris also provided advice on renegotiating ERP contracts when the scope of ERP

Taft Chicago partners Marcus Harris and Daniel Saeedi presented several sessions during the Digital Stratosphere Online Edition, April 20-24, 2020. Each day featured different presenters discussing the new realities of ERP, HCM and digital transformation projects in a post-COVID-19 world. Harris and Saeedi spoke jointly on “How to Negotiate (and Renegotiate) ERP Contracts During

A recent court decision clarifies the types of best practices that are needed in order to invoke the trade secret protections of the federal Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA) and parallel state law. The case provides important guidance for employers as to best practices for safeguarding proprietary information, and it also serves as a warning

On Jan. 25, 2019, the Illinois Supreme Court issued a landmark opinion in Rosenbach v. Six Flags Entertainment Corporation, a case brought under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (“BIPA”). 740 ILCS 14/1 et seq. The court reversed the decision of the Illinois appellate court and held that a plaintiff may bring a lawsuit